UNDP Human Development Report 2016 launched in Bahrain

Group Photo GHDR Launch 2016H.E. Dr. Sh. Abdulla bin Ahmed Al Khalifa, Undersecretary for International Affairs at MoFA, H.E. Mr. Amin El Sharkawi, UN Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative, and H.E. Dr. Selim Jahan, Director of the Human Development Report Office and Lead Author of the report, at the UNDP Human Development Report launch. (Manama, Bahrain)

 

On April 3rd, 2017 the United Nations Development Programme in Bahrain, under the auspices His Excellency Dr. Sh. Abdulla bin Ahmed Al Khalifa, Undersecretary for International Affairs at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, hosted the launch of the Global Human Development Report 2016: Human Development for Everyone.  First in its kind for Bahrain, the event, which took place in the UN House building located in Hoora, gathered several participants, including government authorities, ambassadors, entrepreneurs, academic institutions, civil society organizations, and representatives of the media. 

 

A quarter-century of impressive human development progress continues to leave many people behind, with systemic, often unmeasured, barriers to catching up. A stronger focus on those excluded and on actions to dismantle these barriers is urgently needed to ensure sustainable human development for all. The report finds that although average human development improved significantly across all regions from 1990 to 2015, one in three people worldwide continue to live in low levels of human development, as measured by the Human Development Index.

 

Amin_SpeechH.E. Mr. Amin El Sharkawi during his opening speech. (Manama, Bahrain)

 

The United Nations Resident Coordinator and United Nations Development Programme Resident Representative, H.E. Mr. Amin El Sharkawi, gave welcome remarks to the public, emphasizing the links between this year’s Human Development Report and Bahrain’s opportunity to foster competitiveness, sustainability and fairness. “To view development through a multi-faceted lens that incorporates health and education provides us with a more balanced picture of progress than simply relying on economic indicators alone” he stated, adding that: “The Kingdom of Bahrain achieved a high HDI this year while focusing on education and health, while other countries simply focused on income.”  

HE_Sh_Abdulla_SpeechH.E. Dr. Sh. Abdulla bin Ahmed Al Khalifa during delivers his speech at the UN House in Manama. (Manama, Bahrain)

 

In his intervention, H.E. Dr. Sh. Abdulla bin Ahmed Al Khalifa, gave a special keynote speech to the public, noting that “Development that does not have the citizen as its target is futile and undesirable” those were the words of H.M. the King during the launch of the Bahrain Economic Vision 2030, clearly affirming that the wellbeing, happiness and stability of our citizens are the main pillars of development in all fields and that the Government’s efforts to achieve the international development goals go in parallel with its national economic vision and the Government Action Plan.”.  

 

Women tend to be poorer, earn less, and have fewer opportunities in most aspects of life than men. In 100 countries, women are legally excluded from some jobs because of their gender, and in 18 countries, women need their husband’s approval to work.

 

Populations living in rural areas also face multiple barriers. For instance, children from poor rural households attending school are less likely to be learning reading, writing and mathematics. Moreover, migrants and refugees often face barriers to work, education and political participation and more than 250 million people in the world face discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity, the report notes among other examples.

 

 

In his intervention, H.E. Dr. Sh. Abdulla bin Ahmed Al Khalifa, gave a special keynote speech to the public, noting that “Development that does not have the citizen as its target is futile and undesirable” those were the words of H.M. the King during the launch of the Bahrain Economic Vision 2030, clearly affirming that the wellbeing, happiness and stability of our citizens are the main pillars of development in all fields and that the Government’s efforts to achieve the international development goals go in parallel with its national economic vision and the Government Action Plan.”

 

Women tend to be poorer, earn less, and have fewer opportunities in most aspects of life than men. In 100 countries, women are legally excluded from some jobs because of their gender, and in 18 countries, women need their husband’s approval to work.

 

Populations living in rural areas also face multiple barriers. For instance, children from poor rural households attending school are less likely to be learning reading, writing and mathematics. Moreover, migrants and refugees often face barriers to work, education and political participation and more than 250 million people in the world face discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity, the report notes among other examples.

One of the highlights of the evening was the presentation to the public by Dr. Selim Jahan, Lead Author of the Global Report, and Director of UNDP’s Human Development Report Office, in New York. “We place too much attention on national averages, which often mask enormous variations in people’s lives,” stated Selim Jahan. “In order to advance, we need to examine more closely not just what has been achieved, but also who has been excluded and why.”

 

“Despite progress gaps, universal human development is attainable,” said Selim Jahan. “Over the last decades, we have witnessed achievements in human development that were once thought impossible.” He added that "Bahrain has been in the very high human development category since 2010, making phenomenal progress in health, education, and women's empowerment. For example, its under-5 mortality rate at 6.2 per 1,000 live births is lower than the OECD average at 6.9 per 1,000 live births."

 

According to the Human Development Index (HDI), which measures development on the basis of countries’ average income, education and health, in this report Bahrain is ranked as 47th of 188 across the planet, having experienced increasing levels of HDI since 1990 (the earliest year with available data). 

 

The report stresses the importance of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to build on these gains, noting that the agenda and human development approach are mutually reinforcing.

The report includes recommendations to reorient policies to ensure progress reaches those furthest behind, and urges reforms of global markets and global institutions to make them more equitable and representative. 

 

 

In his intervention, H.E. Dr. Sh. Abdulla bin Ahmed Al Khalifa, gave a special keynote speech to the public, noting that “Development that does not have the citizen as its target is futile and undesirable” those were the words of H.M. the King during the launch of the Bahrain Economic Vision 2030, clearly affirming that the wellbeing, happiness and stability of our citizens are the main pillars of development in all fields and that the Government’s efforts to achieve the international development goals go in parallel with its national economic vision and the Government Action Plan.”

 

Women tend to be poorer, earn less, and have fewer opportunities in most aspects of life than men. In 100 countries, women are legally excluded from some jobs because of their gender, and in 18 countries, women need their husband’s approval to work.

 

Populations living in rural areas also face multiple barriers. For instance, children from poor rural households attending school are less likely to be learning reading, writing and mathematics. Moreover, migrants and refugees often face barriers to work, education and political participation and more than 250 million people in the world face discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity, the report notes among other examples.

One of the highlights of the evening was the presentation to the public by Dr. Selim Jahan, Lead Author of the Global Report, and Director of UNDP’s Human Development Report Office, in New York. “We place too much attention on national averages, which often mask enormous variations in people’s lives,” stated Selim Jahan. “In order to advance, we need to examine more closely not just what has been achieved, but also who has been excluded and why.”

 

“Despite progress gaps, universal human development is attainable,” said Selim Jahan. “Over the last decades, we have witnessed achievements in human development that were once thought impossible.” He added that "Bahrain has been in the very high human development category since 2010, making phenomenal progress in health, education, and women's empowerment. For example, its under-5 mortality rate at 6.2 per 1,000 live births is lower than the OECD average at 6.9 per 1,000 live births."

 

According to the Human Development Index (HDI), which measures development on the basis of countries’ average income, education and health, in this report Bahrain is ranked as 47th of 188 across the planet, having experienced increasing levels of HDI since 1990 (the earliest year with available data). 

 

The report stresses the importance of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to build on these gains, noting that the agenda and human development approach are mutually reinforcing.

The report includes recommendations to reorient policies to ensure progress reaches those furthest behind, and urges reforms of global markets and global institutions to make them more equitable and representative. 

 

 

In his intervention, H.E. Dr. Sh. Abdulla bin Ahmed Al Khalifa, gave a special keynote speech to the public, noting that “Development that does not have the citizen as its target is futile and undesirable” those were the words of H.M. the King during the launch of the Bahrain Economic Vision 2030, clearly affirming that the wellbeing, happiness and stability of our citizens are the main pillars of development in all fields and that the Government’s efforts to achieve the international development goals go in parallel with its national economic vision and the Government Action Plan.”

 

Women tend to be poorer, earn less, and have fewer opportunities in most aspects of life than men. In 100 countries, women are legally excluded from some jobs because of their gender, and in 18 countries, women need their husband’s approval to work.

 

Populations living in rural areas also face multiple barriers. For instance, children from poor rural households attending school are less likely to be learning reading, writing and mathematics. Moreover, migrants and refugees often face barriers to work, education and political participation and more than 250 million people in the world face discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity, the report notes among other examples.

One of the highlights of the evening was the presentation to the public by Dr. Selim Jahan, Lead Author of the Global Report, and Director of UNDP’s Human Development Report Office, in New York. “We place too much attention on national averages, which often mask enormous variations in people’s lives,” stated Selim Jahan. “In order to advance, we need to examine more closely not just what has been achieved, but also who has been excluded and why.”

 

“Despite progress gaps, universal human development is attainable,” said Selim Jahan. “Over the last decades, we have witnessed achievements in human development that were once thought impossible.” He added that "Bahrain has been in the very high human development category since 2010, making phenomenal progress in health, education, and women's empowerment. For example, its under-5 mortality rate at 6.2 per 1,000 live births is lower than the OECD average at 6.9 per 1,000 live births."

 

According to the Human Development Index (HDI), which measures development on the basis of countries’ average income, education and health, in this report Bahrain is ranked as 47th of 188 across the planet, having experienced increasing levels of HDI since 1990 (the earliest year with available data). 

 

The report stresses the importance of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to build on these gains, noting that the agenda and human development approach are mutually reinforcing.

The report includes recommendations to reorient policies to ensure progress reaches those furthest behind, and urges reforms of global markets and global institutions to make them more equitable and representative. 

 
Mr_Selim_Jahan_SpeechH.E. Dr. Selim Jahan presents the report's main findings to the public. (Manama, Bahrain)

 

One of the highlights of the evening was the presentation to the public by H.E. Dr. Selim Jahan, Lead Author of the Global Report, and Director of UNDP’s Human Development Report Office, in New York. “We place too much attention on national averages, which often mask enormous variations in people’s lives,” stated His Excellency. “In order to advance, we need to examine more closely not just what has been achieved, but also who has been excluded and why.”

 

“Despite progress gaps, universal human development is attainable,” said Mr. Jahan. “Over the last decades, we have witnessed achievements in human development that were once thought impossible.” He added that "Bahrain has been in the very high human development category since 2010, making phenomenal progress in health, education, and women's empowerment. For example, its under-5 mortality rate at 6.2 per 1,000 live births is lower than the OECD average at 6.9 per 1,000 live births."

 

According to the Human Development Index (HDI), which measures development on the basis of countries’ average income, education and health, in this report Bahrain is ranked as 47th of 188 across the planet, having experienced increasing levels of HDI since 1990 (the earliest year with available data). 

 

The report stresses the importance of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to build on these gains, noting that the agenda and human development approach are mutually reinforcing.

The report includes recommendations to reorient policies to ensure progress reaches those furthest behind, and urges reforms of global markets and global institutions to make them more equitable and representative.